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CHRONOLOGY OF THOMAS JEFFERSON AND THE NEW NATION

Thomas Jefferson was the voice of the unique republic that broke away from the British Empire. Events in his personal life, his political writings, and his singular contributions to the birth of the new nation are chronicled in this Chronology of Thomas Jefferson and the New Nation.

 

Thomas Jefferson and his Philosophical Legacy

Few scholars have studied Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826) as a philosopher, perhaps because he never wrote a formal philosophical treatise. Yet Jefferson was a prodigious writer, who left behind a rich philosophical legacy in his declarations, presidential messages and addresses, public papers, numerous bills, letters to philosophically minded correspondents, and his only book, Notes on the State of Virginia. M. Andrew Holowchak has created another area of Jefferson scholarship in his article Thomas Jefferson, published in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 

 

Father of the University of Virginia

The last great endeavor of Jefferson's life was the founding of the University of Virginia. He was 65 years old, but undertook the design and construction of a new University. He established the disciplines, planned the curriculum, and hired the instructors. In this essay, Richard Dixon, editor of Jefferson Notes, chronicles the events that led Jefferson to claim on his tombstone that he was Father of the University of Virginia.

 

Jefferson and the Act to Establish Religious Freedom

More than 200 years after the Virginia legislature adopted the Act to Establish Religious Freedom, and its influence on the U.S. Constitution, America and the world remains challenged by the tension between church and state. RichardDixon, editor of Jefferson Notes, traces the authorship of Thomas Jefferson and the contributions of George Mason and James Madison in the essay Jefferson and the Act to Establish Religious Freedom.

 

Jefferson and the Declaration of Independence

Jefferson wanted his authorship of the Declaration of Independence engraved on his tombstone. In the early days of the American Revolution, his contribution was not widely known. Richard Dixon, editor of Jefferson Notes, sets the stage for the emergence of this great document of individual freedom from the pen of Jefferson in the essay Jefferson and the Declaration of Independence.

 

Jefferson and Slavery

No area of Thomas Jefferson's life has aroused more controversy than his views and actions on slavery. Richard Dixon, Editor of Jefferson's Notes, traces the evolution of Jefferson's thought in the article Jefferson and Slavery.

 

World of Thomas Jefferson

Jefferson's life is framed by the Declaration of Independence and his founding of the University of Virginia, but it was played out against the sweep of political and social upheaval throughout the world. Richard Dixon, Editor of Jefferson Notes, presents in Part One and Part Two, a chronology of Jefferson's world.

 

Jefferson Resolution by Virginia General Assembly

On April 13, 2009, a joint resolution by the Senate and House of Delegates of the Virginia General Assembly was presented to W. McKenzie Wallenborn, President of the Thomas Jefferson Heritage Society, by Senator John Watkins.

 

Law and Thomas Jefferson

The talents of Thomas Jefferson reached into so many fields it is easy to overlook that he was educated as a lawyer and that was the activity of his early years. Richard E. Dixon examines Jefferson's eight years as a lawyer in the article Law and Thomas Jefferson.

 

Jefferson and Medicine

Thomas Jefferson, truly a man for all seasons, was deeply involved in medicine. How he found time for this interest is truly amazing considering that he spent over 35 years in service to our young country, and put much effort into his many other fields of expertise, which included architecture, scientific farming, botany, archeology, paleontology, and astronomy, to name but a few. Thomas Jefferson and the Medicine of His Day by White McKenzie Wallenborn, M.D., was published in the Medical Alumni News, University of Virginia, Spring 2002, Volume 1.

 

Jefferson and Poetry

"I was at the Jefferson Memorial Library in Monticello to write a book about Thomas Jefferson's interest in Romantic poetry, but I had little to go on. The library was daunting, filled with volumes on Jefferson and gardening, Jefferson and architecture, everything, it seemed, but Jefferson and poetry." When Jefferson Dined Alone, by Jonathan Gross. Mr. Gross is a professor at DePaul University and author of the forthcoming, Thomas Jefferson's Scrapbooks(Steerforth Press, May 2006). 

 

Jefferson and Architecture: The University of Virginia

"Among the many groups which look to Jefferson as the model of their purpose and embodiment of their ideals, American architects especially can attribute the roots of their profession to the "Sage of Monticello." Although never formally trained in architecture, Jefferson had studied the structures of Europe and read extensively on the great architects of Europe. Possessed by a penchant for masterpieces in a community he would establish as the ideal American village: The University of Virginia."
Jefferson and the Politics of Architecture, by Joshua Johns.

Thomas Jefferson standing, etching by Eliphalet Andrews, 1901

Thomas Jefferson standing, etching by Eliphalet Andrews, 1901

Thomas Jefferson in bronze by Jean Pierre David d'Angers 1834 Rotunda U.S. Capitol

Thomas Jefferson in bronze
by Jean Pierre David d'Angers 1834
Rotunda U.S. Capitol

Jefferson portrait at West Point by Thomas Sully, 1821-22

Jefferson portrait at West Point
by Thomas Sully, 1821-22

Statue honoring Jefferson on the banks of the Seine in Paris, France.

Statue honoring Jefferson on the banks of the Seine in Paris, France.